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Dr. Laurenz Thomsen
Dr. Laurenz Thomsen
Dr.
Professor of Geosciences
Director of Ocean Lab
Life Sciences & Chemistry

Campus Ring 1 | 28759 Bremen | Germany

Fax: 
+49 421 200-3229
Email: 
l.thomsen [at] jacobs-university.de
Office: 
Research III, Room 107
University Education: 
 
1982-1985
University of Heidelberg, undergraduate
1988-1989
Institute for Oceanography, Kiel, graduate student
1989
Diplom  in Biology at University of Kiel, Germany
1990-1992
Research Affiliate at University of Kiel
1992
Doctor of Sciences (Dr. rer. nat.) at University of Kiel
1992-1998
Research Associate in the Department of Environmental Geology, GEOMAR
1995
Guest scientist at the NIVA Institute, Oslo, Norway
1997
Guest scientist at the NIOZ Institute, Texel, Netherlands 
1998
Habilitation at University of Kiel
1999-2001
Heisenberg fellow of the DFG at the School of Oceanography (University of Washington)
09/2001-
Jacobs University faculty
05/2002-
 
2006
2008
 
 
 
Affiliate associate Professor at the School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle
Full professor at Jacobs University Bremen
Research and Teaching Positions: 

Teaching
1992-1998
Lecturer in Biological Oceanography and Geochemistry for graduate students at Kiel University
2000-2001
Visiting lecturer at the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington, undergraduate and graduate classes
2001-
Teaching Geosciences at Jacobs University
2002-
Teaching Benthos at the University of Washington
Teaching Marine Geology at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen

Research
Since 1990 participation in many studies on particle and fluid dynamics at continental margins. Within several interdisciplinary national and international programs  (DFG Sonderforschungsbereich 313), as Postdoc within the EU OMEX program, as associate professor within the Heisenberg program of the DFG at the University of Washington, Seattle, since 2001 within the EU Eurostrataform, Hermes and Hermione programs. The working group concentrates on fluxes of particulate matter within the lowermost water column, the benthic boundary layer. The work supported the discovery that organic carbon is gradually transported down- and alongslope and that the amount is often sufficient to balance sediment carbon mineralization rates. Additionally it became evident that the carbon degradation mainly takes place in the benthic boundary layer. New instrument systems were developed within the EU Alipor and Esonet programs. Experimental work in on animal-water interactions, particle behavior and fluid dynamics as well as theoretical work on aggregation in marine environments is performed in the group.
Since 2009 participation in the Neptune Canada program with our internet operated vehicle, currently working on studies for a better understanding of the different organic matter degradation processes in the water column with special emphasis on hydrodynamic conditions. Involvement in studies on risk assessment and monitoring offshore installations as coordinator of the CORAMM project and on CO2 mitigation programs with microalgae.



International Experience